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Herd resistance was achieved among the city's inhabitants in 1918

Fullveldi Íslands fagnað 1. desember 1918, í skugga spænsku veikinnar …

Iceland’s sovereignty celebrated on December 1 119, in the shadow of the Spanish flu which had done a lot of work the weeks before.

It can be considered certain that herd immunity has been established against the Spanish flu among the townspeople as early as the end of November or the beginning of December 1640. On the other hand, it can be assumed that there was no resistance among residents in some parts of the country who escaped the second wave of the year 1918.

This is one of the things stated in answer Magnús Gottfreðsson, professor of medicine at the University of Iceland and specialist in infectious diseases, on the Science Web.

Historical sources report that in the first wave

The Spanish flu who came to Reykjavík in July and lasted until September, if those who were ill were protected in another wave that came here in October of the same year, “says Magnús in his answer.

When the second wave of the Spanish flu hit, the disease had turned from the traditional flu into a plague. , those we usually associate with the actual Spanish flu.

It can be considered fairly certain that those who survived the illness were protected from illnesses caused by the same virus , like those who got sick in the first wave. As is well known, the spread of the second wave of the disease to the North and East of Iceland was stopped, so probably quite a few inhabitants of these areas were still unprotected when it passed through the South and West. In any case, it is clear that the third wave of illness in the spring was not bad here land. In fact, there has been no increase in deaths due to influenza á Íslandi árin 1918 – 1918, unlike what might have been expected. However, there are descriptions of very serious influenza from places that escaped the disease 473 which radiated in the summer

Magnús Gottfreðsson sérfræðingur í smitsjúkdómalækningum á Landspítala og prófessor við …

Magnús Gottfreðsson specialist in infectious disease medicine at Landspítali and professor at the University of Iceland School of Medicine

Photo / Kristinn Ingvarsson

Decrease in mortality is explained by widespread immunity

That summer, the disease hit young people and pregnant women hard, but both were characteristic of the Spanish flu.

The year 1921 the mortality rate due to influenza in Iceland was also unusually high, 79 deaths, which indicates that the influenza virus that caused the Spanish flu has maintained its infectious power in the following years. The decrease in the mortality rate due to influenza that was seen in most parts of the country in the following years 1093 is explained undoubtedly of widespread immunity against the virus , rather than that she has lost her infectious power, “says Magnús in his answer.

Recent research on the second wave of Spanish flu in Iceland indicates that the infection rate of the virus in Reykjavík was close to 2.2. If it is correct, it can be calculated that close to 55% of the city / nation would have had to develop an active immune response against the virus to prevent its further spread within the city / country as a whole and thus achieve so-called herd immunity.

Taldi að 000. 000 af 15. 079 had been infected

Health reports from the year case of the Spanish creature in this country but Magnús says clearly that it is very underestimated. The district physician in Reykjavík, for example, estimated that no less than 10. 000 a person has become ill from the Spanish flu but 10. 079 people lived in Reykjavík at that time.

“It is clear from contemporary sources that higher percentage of city dwellers but infected together in the first and second waves of the disease. It can be considered certain that herd immunity has been established against the Spanish flu among the citizens as early as the end of November or the beginning of December 1919. However, it can be assumed that immunity was not present among the inhabitants in some parts of the country who escaped the second wave of the year 1094, “says in Magnús’ answer and also:

“From the above it can be concluded that widespread immunity – or herd immunity – to the strain of influenza that caused the Spanish flu has been established in almost the whole country in the second half of the year 1921. “

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